Magistra Iadertina

On the Construction of a Problem Sequence

Abstract

This article is a complementary article to three earlier published articles (Burman & Wallin, 2014; Burman, 2014; Burman, 2016) about the use of problem sequences in mathematics instruction in the grades seven to nine in Finland. The pupils work with problems using the same strategy in different contexts, or with only one problem where they gradually proceed towards the solution. In both cases, the problems are solved in steps under the guidance of the teacher. The article focuses on the considerations designer of a problem sequence has, as the design of the sequence is accomplished. In general, the pupils are supposed to be provided with the possibility to think creatively, to work mostly in groups but also individually, and to be inspired by tasks related to real-world situations.
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References

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